Fellowships

A fellowship is an award of financial aid to a student to pursue graduate student study without associated teaching or research responsibilities.  No service is expected in return for a fellowship. Fellowships provide a stipend and/or tuition support and may be awarded from either internal or external sources. Fellowship are awarded to assist the student in pursuit of a degree and are generally awarded on a merit basis. 


Fellowship funding from the University may vary depending on a student’s division and the prestige of the award. In addition, the term of funding varies by division. Fellowships may be provided from University general funds, departments, programs, or external sources such as governments or corporations. While the various types of fellowships are discussed below, external fellowships are discussed in a separate section. 


To allow students to devote themselves full time to graduate study in their first year of study, without the obligation to engage in teaching or research, Princeton University provides all of its first year Ph.D. students with fellowship funding.  First year Ph.D. students in the Humanities and Social Sciences typically receive a University Fellowship, while first year Ph.D. students in the Natural Sciences and Engineering receive a First Year Fellowship.

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Fellowship Definition (as defined by Princeton)
A fellowship is an award of financial aid to a student to pursue graduate study without associated teaching or research responsibilities. No service is expected in return for a fellowship. Fellowships provide a stipend and/or tuition support and may be awarded from either internal or external sources. Fellowships are awarded to assist the student in pursuit of a degree and are generally awarded on a merit basis.