Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

Academic Year 2022 – 2023

General Information

Address
Robertson Hall
Phone

Program Offerings:

  • Ph.D.
  • M.P.A.
  • M.P.P.
  • Joint Degree

Director of Graduate Studies:

Richard Rogerson (M.P.A.)
Robert Hutchings (M.P.P.)

Graduate Program Administrator:

Ann Lengyel (Ph.D.)

Overview

The Princeton School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) offers a distinctive curriculum that strikes a careful balance between theory and practice. Graduate students spend time developing analytical skills and acquiring a substantive knowledge about the world's most important domestic and international issues.

The School has a diverse faculty representing a wide range of disciplines and expertise, with 21 affiliated research centers and programs.

The School's resources enable students to earn graduate degrees without incurring indebtedness, thereby making it more feasible to pursue careers of public service in the public and nonprofit sectors.

Graduate Programs

The principal graduate program of the school is a two-year curriculum leading to the degree of Master in Public Affairs (M.P.A.). Students can earn a dual degree in public affairs and law (M.P.A./J.D.) after four years of study in SPIA  and a collaborating law school. The School also offers a dual degree in business (M.P.A./M.B.A) with the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. 

The School also has a graduate program leading to a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in public and international affairs, as well as a one-year Master in Public Policy (M.P.P.) for mid-career professionals.

Apply

Application deadline
December 15, 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (This deadline is for applications for enrollment beginning in fall 2023)
Program length
Ph.D. 5 years, M.P.A. 2 years, M.P.A. – J.D. 4 years, M.P.A. - M.B.A. 3 years, M.P.P. 1 year
Fee
$75
GRE
The General Test is required for M.P.A applicants. Not required for Ph.D. and M.P.P. applicants.

Additional departmental requirements

Ph.D. – 25 page sample of research. Applicants are required to select a cluster when applying.

M.P.A. – Course list. 4 page policy memo. Applicants are required to select a field when applying.

M.P.A. – J.D. – Course list. 4 page policy memo. 2 page joint degree statement. Applicants are required to select a field when applying.

M.P.A. - M.B.A. – Course list. 4 page policy memo. 2 page joint degree statement. Applicants are required to select a field when applying.

M.P.P. – 4 page policy memo. Applicants are required to select a field when applying. Mid-career professionals are required to have a minimum of 7 years’ experience.

M.P.A. and M.P.P. - Must have 3 letters of recommendation: preference for 1 professional letter, 1 academic reference letter, and 1 letter from a faculty member, administrator, or professional who can comment on the applicant's commitment to public service.

M.P.A , M.P.A. - J.D., M.P.A.-M.B.A., M.P.P. - Beyond your resume, personal statement, policy memo, letters of recommendation, transcripts, and GRE scores, we want to get to know you on a more personal and individual basis. Please submit a concise, one-page, double-spaced statement based on the following:

We all come from somewhere and it shapes us - both who we become and what we value. Tell us your story and what shaped you.

M.P.P. - Beyond your resume, personal statement, policy memo, letters of recommendation, and transcripts, we want to get to know you on a more personal and individual basis. Please submit a concise, one-page, double-spaced statement based on the following:

We all come from somewhere and it shapes us - both who we become and what we value. Tell us your story and what shaped you.

Program Offerings

Program description

The purpose of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs' doctoral program is to train top-quality researchers in critical areas of public policy.  It offers a Doctor of Philosophy in Public Affairs in two research clusters: Security Studies; and Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP).  The goal is to enroll eight students per year in the program, with four in each research cluster.

Courses

Core courses and individual requirements are determined by the faculty in each cluster. Both clusters require advanced politics and econometrics training for social science research.  A student in the STEP cluster must take at least eight courses in the first two years, and a minimum of three courses must come from within SPIA or from science or engineering departments, selected with approval of the primary adviser and the faculty coordinator of the STEP Ph.D. cluster.  A student in the Security cluster takes 12 courses during the first two years.  All students are required to maintain an overall grade average of 85 (B) or higher to remain in the Ph.D. program.  Full requirements are available on the SPIA website.

Additional pre-generals requirements

Writing Requirement

Students are required to complete an original research paper of publishable quality.

General exam

The examination covers two fields identified by the student in consultation with a faculty committee and includes two written components.  Students in both clusters may be required to complete an oral examination, depending on their performance on the written components. Students are expected to complete all parts of the general examination by the end of the second year.

Qualifying for the M.A.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree is normally an incidental degree on the way to full Ph.D. candidacy and is earned after a student successfully completes all coursework and the general examination.  It may also be awarded to students who, for various reasons, leave the Ph.D. program, provided that the M.A. requirements have been met.

Teaching

A six-hour teaching assignment (precepting), usually following the general examination, is required.

Post-Generals requirements

A written research prospectus is required.

Dissertation and FPO

After a candidate successfully completes the general examination and defends the written prospectus, the Ph.D. program committee approves entry into the dissertation phase of the program.  

The student prepares a dissertation for review by the faculty. Departmental acceptance of the dissertation qualifies the candidate for the final public oral examination.  The Final Public Oral (FPO) examination is required by University regulations, and is conducted after the dissertation has been recommended for acceptance by the School.

The Ph.D. is awarded after the candidate’s doctoral dissertation has been accepted and the FPO examination completed.

Program description

The Master in Public Affairs (M.P.A.) offers rigorous preparation for international and domestic policy careers.

This two-year, full-time residential program cultivates among its students and graduates a lasting commitment to public service.

Through its core curriculum and a wide variety of elective courses, students learn analytical skills that address the political, economic, quantitative, behavioral and normative aspects of complex policy problems. 

Each M.P.A. candidate selects a policy field in which to specialize from the school’s four fields of concentration: international relations, international development, domestic policy, and economics and public policy. Students may also earn a joint degree in public affairs and law (M.P.A./J.D.), or in public affairs and business (M.P.A./M.B.A.). Certificate programs offer additional areas of specialization in fields such as health policy; science, technology, and environmental policy (STEP); and urban policy.

Significant financial aid resources are dedicated to enable SPIA students the opportunity to receive graduate degrees without incurring loan indebtedness and to launch them into public service careers in the public and nonprofit sectors.

Courses

Students must complete 16 full-term courses in an approved plan of study, attaining an overall average in the 16 courses of 80 or better. The overall average includes actual grades in courses taken Pass/D/Fail. The curriculum of the M.P.A. program includes seven required core courses that address skills and techniques needed for the systematic study of public policy problems. The courses cover political analysis, quantitative methods, and economic and behavioral analysis. 

Additional requirements

Policy Workshops
Graduate policy workshops are a unique part of the SPIA graduate curriculum.

Policy workshops provide students with an opportunity to use the analytical skills they have acquired in the first year in the program to analyze complex and challenging policy issues, usually for real clients. Each workshop consists of 8 - 10 students who work in teams to evaluate a policy challenge.

The workshops emphasize policy implementation, and it is this emphasis that distinguishes them from regular courses. The goal of the workshops is to understand a policy issue in great depth and to make policy recommendations that are both creative and realistic, given the relevant institutional and political constraints.

DEI half-term course
All students must take at least one half-term course that focuses on diversity, equity and inclusion during the two-year course of study.  A list of pre-approved courses will be made available to students each academic year.

Required summer course in Race, Power and Inequality 
All students must take a summer course (SPI 500) Race, Power and Inequality which precedes all other core courses and is integrated into the four-week summer program. This is a for-credit half-term course, with mandatory PDF grading.

Integrated Policy Exercise (IPE)
In late January, before spring semester courses begin, first-year M.P.A. students are required to take part in a policy project called the Integrated Policy Exercise, or IPE.

The IPE requires students to apply the skills they acquired in the fall term core courses. They are given briefing materials to review in advance and are then required to submit a comprehensive memo in response to a set of specific policy questions. The IPE is a trial run for the first-year qualifying examination (QE1).

Qualifying Examination 1 (QE1)
In late April/early May, at the end of the second semester, students are required to take the QE1, a graded exercise that closely parallels the IPE.

The QE1 requires an integrated use of all the analytical skills acquired in the first-year core curriculum.

Qualifying Examination 2 (QE2)
Second-year students are required to take and pass a second qualifying exam (QE2) in their chosen field of concentration at the end of the second year.

Internship
Students must successfully complete an internship approved by the Internship Committee.

Program description

The Princeton School of Public and International Affairs offers a one-year Master in Public Policy (M.P.P.) degree for mid-career professionals who are rising leaders in international and domestic public policy.  This residential program is designed for mid-career professionals with seven or more years of public service experience in government agencies or nonprofit organizations in the United States and abroad.

The M.P.P. program provides rigorous training in economic, behavioral, political, and organizational analysis. Students may also choose to specialize and earn a certificate in one of the following: health and health policy (HHP); science, technology, and environmental policy (STEP); or urban policy (UP).

Courses

To qualify for the degree, M.P.P. candidates must successfully complete eight courses.

A typical M.P.P. program of study will include a specialization in one of the school’s four fields of concentration:

  • International Relations
  • International Development
  • Domestic Policy
  • Economics and Public Policy

Additional requirements

All M.P.P. students begin with a six-week summer program that includes intensive courses in microeconomics and statistics, and a policy analysis and leadership seminar.

The summer program is designed to enhance students’ preparation for graduate-level courses. The seminar aims to introduce them to the approaches they will encounter in SPIA courses during the academic year, while also helping them get to know their peers and refine their learning objectives for the year.

Program description

Some students may wish to combine the School's program in public affairs with study for a degree in a related professional field.

A joint M.P.A.-J.D. degree program that combines public affairs with the study of law is offered in cooperation with the law schools of New York University, Columbia, Stanford, and Yale. On occasion, joint programs with other law schools have been approved by the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and the cooperating law school.

The joint program shortens the time involved in obtaining the two degrees and makes possible an effective combination of the several disciplines involved in public policy analysis. Participating students spend five semesters at the cooperating law school and three semesters at SPIA, thus reducing by two semesters the normal time required to earn the two degrees. Enrollment in the joint program requires a separate application and admission to each school.

For a small number of exceptionally strong candidates, the School will accept applications for a joint program that combines public and international affairs with the study of business administration. Proposals giving a detailed rationale for such a joint program must be submitted at the time of application. At this time, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business is the only cooperating business school. A joint degree programs will normally shorten by one semester the length of time required to complete each of the individual programs.

Faculty

  • Dean

    • Amaney A. Jamal
  • Vice Dean

    • Miguel A. Centeno
  • Chair

    • Amaney A. Jamal
  • Director of Graduate Studies

    • Denise L. Mauzerall
  • Director of Undergraduate Studies

    • Susan L. Marquis
  • Professor

    • Gary J. Bass
    • Roland J. Benabou
    • Alan S. Blinder
    • Carles Boix
    • Charles M. Cameron
    • Miguel A. Centeno
    • Christopher F. Chyba
    • Janet M. Currie
    • Rafaela M. Dancygier
    • Kathryn J. Edin
    • Christopher L. Eisgruber
    • Susan T. Fiske
    • Aaron L. Friedberg
    • Filiz Garip
    • Noreen Goldman
    • Bryan T. Grenfell
    • Gene M. Grossman
    • G. John Ikenberry
    • Harold James
    • Seema Jayachandran
    • Jennifer L. Jennings
    • Henrik J. Kleven
    • Atul Kohli
    • David S. Lee
    • Frances E. Lee
    • John B. Londregan
    • Alexandre Mas
    • Douglas S. Massey
    • Denise L. Mauzerall
    • Nolan McCarty
    • Atif R. Mian
    • Helen V. Milner
    • Sanyu A. Mojola
    • Eduardo Morales
    • Andrew Moravcsik
    • Layna Mosley
    • Michael Oppenheimer
    • Pietro Ortoleva
    • Elizabeth L. Paluck
    • Grigore Pop-Eleches
    • Markus Prior
    • Stephen J. Redding
    • Richard Rogerson
    • Cecilia E. Rouse
    • Kim Lane Scheppele
    • Eldar Shafir
    • Harold T. Shapiro
    • Jacob N. Shapiro
    • Patrick T. Sharkey
    • Stacey A. Sinclair
    • Paul E. Starr
    • James Raymond Vreeland
    • Keith A. Wailoo
    • Leonard Wantchekon
    • Mark W. Watson
    • Elke U. Weber
    • Ismail K. White
    • Jennifer A. Widner
    • David S. Wilcove
    • Deborah J. Yashar
    • Julian E. Zelizer
    • Owen M. Zidar
  • Associate Professor

    • Elizabeth M. Armstrong
    • Alin I. Coman
    • Thomas Fujiwara
    • Alexander Glaser
    • C. Jessica E. Metcalf
    • Emily Pronin
  • Assistant Professor

    • Adam M. Goldstein
    • Tanushree Goyal
    • John R. Grigsby
    • Andy Guess
    • Saad A. Gulzar
    • Arun Hendi
    • Adam Kapor
    • Patricia A. Kirkland
    • Aleksandra Korolova
    • Zhao Li
    • Jonathan Mayer
    • Jonathan F. Mummolo
    • Rebecca L. Perlman
    • Maria Micaela Sviatschi
    • Rory Truex
    • Guadalupe Tuñón
    • Andreas B. Wiedemann
    • Xu Xu
  • Associated Faculty

    • Alison E. Isenberg, History
    • Guy J.P. Nordenson, Architecture
  • Instructor

    • Naima N. Green-Riley
  • Lecturer with Rank of Professor

    • Robert L. Hutchings
    • Stanley N. Katz
  • Professor of the Practice

    • Heather H. Howard
  • Lecturer

    • Alicia Adsera
    • Frederick D. Barton
    • Annie Bird
    • Benjamin H. Bradlow
    • Devanne E. Brookins
    • Barbara C. Buckinx
    • Andrew C. Buher
    • Wendy Castillo
    • Tithi Chattopadhyay
    • Zack Cooper
    • Amy B. Craft
    • Richard W. DiSalvo
    • Lynda G. Dodd
    • Edward P. Freeland
    • Varun Gauri
    • Jean B. Grossman
    • William G. Guthe
    • Julio A. Guzman
    • Doyle Hodges
    • Meg Jacobs
    • Gregory B. Jaczko
    • Kiki Jamieson
    • Steven A. Kelts
    • Amy Kenyon
    • Tessie Krishna
    • Mihir E. Kshirsagar
    • Daniel C. Kurtzer
    • Anastasia Mann
    • Susan L. Marquis
    • Daniel J. Meuse
    • Ashoka Mody
    • Sofia Moroni
    • Timothy J. Nelson
    • Udi Ofer
    • Minh-Thu D. Pham
    • Juan C. Pinzon
    • Gregory B. Poling
    • Thomas A. Shannon
    • Arian M. Sharifi
    • Alyssa B. Sharkey
    • Tsering W. Shawa
    • Nicky Sheats
    • Sarah L. Staszak
    • J. Zach Vertin
    • Lauren Wright
  • Visiting Professor

    • Sahar F. Aziz
    • Martin S. Flaherty
    • Carsten A. Holz
    • Ethan B. Kapstein
  • Visiting Associate Professor

    • Sherwat Elwan Ibrahim
    • Julia S. Rubin
  • Visiting Lecturer

    • Eduardo Bhatia
    • Martha B. Coven
    • Mickey Edwards
    • Salam Fayyad
    • Richard F. Keevey
    • Steven Strauss

For a full list of faculty members and fellows please visit the department or program website.

Permanent Courses

Courses listed below are graduate-level courses that have been approved by the program’s faculty as well as the Curriculum Subcommittee of the Faculty Committee on the Graduate School as permanent course offerings. Permanent courses may be offered by the department or program on an ongoing basis, depending on curricular needs, scheduling requirements, and student interest. Not listed below are undergraduate courses and one-time-only graduate courses, which may be found for a specific term through the Registrar’s website. Also not listed are graduate-level independent reading and research courses, which may be approved by the Graduate School for individual students.

POL 506 - Qualitative Methods (also SPI 595)

Introduction to techniques used by political scientists in "small-n" research. Discusses the types of theoretical and empirical questions that are associated with in-depth analysis of a small number of cases. The emphasis is on systematic measurements and inferential startegies, including case selection, periodization, structured comparison, analytic narrative, and the integration of qualitative and statistical methods in research design. The course also includes discussion of the mechanics of qualitative research, including field methods, in-depth interviewing, and archival research. (Doesn't prepare for Gen. Exm. in F&Q.)

POP 507 - Generalized Linear Statistical Models (also SPI 509)

The analysis of survey data using generalized linear statistical models. The course begins with a review of linear models for continuous responses and then considers logistic regression models for binary data and log-linear models for count data, including rates and contingency tables and hazard models for duration data. Attention is given to the logical and mathematical foundations of the techniques, but the main emphasis is on the applications, including computer usage. The course assumes prior exposure to statistics at the level of WWS507c and familiarity with matrix algebra and calculus.

SPI 500 - Race, Power, and Inequality

This course provides the intellectual foundations for policy students to understand race, power, and inequality issues in the United States, with some comparative international perspectives. The course examines these and other issues of identity and inequities through various disciplines, including history, politics, psychology, sociology, economics, and natural sciences. The course hopes to highlight some possible solutions to the persistent problems of inequality and racial injustice in the U.S. and abroad.

SPI 501 - The Politics of Public Policy

An analysis of the forces that shape the behavior of public organizations and individuals in organizational settings. The emphasis is on the workings of U.S. governmental agencies. Special attention is given to writing skills as they apply to the roles of advisers and decision makers in public-sector organizations.

SPI 502 - Psychology for Policy Analysis and Implementation

Basic concepts and experimental findings of psychology that contribute to an understanding of the effects of policy on human behavior and well-being. Also covered are psychological factors that affect the formulation, communication, and execution of policy. Topics include a descriptive analysis of boundedly rational judgment and decision making, a consideration of social motives and attitudes, and an introduction to the ways in which agents influence and negotiate with one another.

SPI 503 - Management of Non-Profit Organizations

The management of for-profit, governmental, and not-for-profit organizations in both developed and developing countries. Tailoring management strategies and organizational processes to different organizations in different environments is emphasized. The analysis of management cases focuses on organizational problem solving.

SPI 504 - Policy Issues and Analysis of Nonprofits, NGOs, and Philanthropy

Examines policy issues at international, national and local levels. Provides groundwork on nonprofits, NGOs, and philanthropy that can be followed with specialized courses on management and program evaluation. Emphasis on understanding how philanthropy, nonprofit, and NGO sectors operate, their niche alongside private and public sectors, revenue sources, impact on society, and converse effects of society and its institutions; the policy making process. Explores impact of reliance on government or overseas support for Third World NGOs; faith-based service provisions: accountability and transparency; advocacy; and government regulations.

SPI 505 - Financial Management in the Corporate and Public Sectors

Investment, valuation, and financing of the corporation, focusing on the application of economic theory and the analytical tools to the solution of financial problems. The interrelations between investment and financing policies and their dependence on security valuations are stressed.

SPI 506 - The Sociology of Organizations

Formal organizations are key to understanding most facets of modern life. This course examines organizations as complex social systems, which reflect and shape their broader social environments. The first half explores why organizations look and act the way they do: Why are they so bureaucratic? How do they influence one another? Why are they so often resistant to change? The second half of the course focuses on the consequences of organizational practices: How do they shape work, inequality and diversity? How do they mediate the effects of public policies? How do they become instruments of political change?

SPI 507B - Quantitative Analysis for Policymakers

Data analysis techniques, stressing application to public policy. The course includes measurement, descriptive statistics, data collection, probability, exploratory data analysis, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, correlation, and graphical procedures. Some training is offered in the use of computers. No previous training in statistics is required. The course is divided into separate sections according to the student's level of mathematical sophistication. The basic level assumes a fluency in high school algebra as a minimum, while the advanced level assumes a fluency in calculus.

SPI 507C - Quantitative Analysis for Policymakers (Advanced)

Data analysis techniques, stressing application to public policy. The course includes measurement, descriptive statistics, data collection, probability, exploratory data analysis, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, correlation, and graphical procedures. Some training is offered in the use of computers. No previous training in statistics is required. The course is divided into separate sections according to the student's level of mathematical sophistication. The basic level assumes a fluency in high school algebra as a minimum, while the advanced level assumes a fluency in calculus.

SPI 508A - Econometrics for Policymakers: Applications (Half-Term)

Provides hands-on experience in the application of econometric methods to policy issues. Various aspects of empirical research in economics will be covered including 1) development of testable hypotheses, 2) appropriate use of data, 3) specification and estimation of econometric models. The course will be taught using a set of cases in which students apply quantitative methods covered in WWS 507b to data in order to answer specific policy questions. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting and writing about results.

SPI 508B - Econometrics for Policymakers (Half-Term)

Provides a thorough examination of statistical methods employed in public policy analysis, with a particular emphasis on regression methods which are frequently employed in research across the social sciences. Emphasizes intuitive understanding of the central concepts, and develops in students the ability to choose and employ the appropriate tool for a particular research problem, and understand the limitations of the techniques. Prerequisite: 507b.

SPI 508C - Econometrics for Policymakers (Advanced)

The main tools of econometric analysis and the way in which they are applied to a range of problems in social science. The emphasis is on using techniques and understanding and critically assessing others' use of them. There is a great deal of practical work on the computer using a range of data from around the world. Topics include regression analysis, with a focus on regression as a tool for analyzing nonexperimental data and discrete choice. An introduction to time-series analysis is given. There are applications from macroeconomics, policy evaluation, and economic development.

SPI 508D - Econometrics and Public Policy (Accelerated)

The main tools of econometric analysis and the way in which they are applied to a range of problems in social science. Emphasis is on using the techniques and understanding and critically assessing others' use of them. There is a great deal of practical work on the computer using a range of data from around the world. Topics include regression analysis, with a focus on regression as a tool for analyzing nonexperimental data and discrete choice. An introduction to time-series analysis is given, as are applications from macroeconomics, policy evaluation, and economic development.

SPI 511B - Microeconomic Analysis for Policymakers

Courses 511 and 512 provide systematic exposition of principles and techniques of economic theory most useful in analyzing economic aspects of public affairs. The courses are divided into separate sections according to a student's previous experience with economics and his or her level of mathematical sophistication. The basic level assumes a fluency in high school algebra and a basic knowledge of calculus concepts, while the advanced level assumes a fluency in calculus and some previous exposure to economics. 511d assumes a strong preparation in economics, is more technical than 511c, and has an applied orientation.

SPI 511C - Microeconomic Analysis for Policymakers (Advanced)

Courses 511 and 512 provide systematic exposition of principles and techniques of economic theory most useful in analyzing economic aspects of public affairs. The courses are divided into separate sections according to a student's previous experience with economics and his or her level of mathematical sophistication. The basic level assumes a fluency in high school algebra and a basic knowledge of calculus concepts, while the advanced level assumes a fluency in calculus and some previous exposure to economics. Courses 511b and 511c are offered <I>fall </I>2000. Courses 512b and 512c are offered <I>spring</I> 2001.

SPI 512B - Macroeconomic Analysis for Policymakers

Courses 511 and 512 provide systematic exposition of principles and techniques of economic theory most useful in analyzing economic aspects of public affairs. The courses are divided into separate sections according to a student's previous experience with economics and his or her level of mathematical sophistication. The basic level assumes a fluency in high school algebra and a basic knowledge of calculus concepts, while the advanced level assumes a fluency in calculus and some previous exposure to economics. Courses 511b and 511c are offered <I>fall </I>2000. Courses 512b and 512c are offered <I>spring</I> 2001.

SPI 512C - Macroeconomic Analysis for Policymakers (Advanced)

Courses 511 and 512 provide systematic exposition of principles and techniques of economic theory most useful in analyzing economic aspects of public affairs. The courses are divided into separate sections according to a student's previous experience with economics and his or her level of mathematical sophistication. The basic level assumes a fluency in high school algebra and a basic knowledge of calculus concepts, while the advanced level assumes a fluency in calculus and some previous exposure to economics. Courses 511b and 511c are offered <I>fall </I>2000. Courses 512b and 512c are offered <I>spring</I> 2001.

SPI 515B - Program and Policy Evaluation

Course explores ways to judge the efficacy of policies and programs, to assess the benefits and costs of policy or program changes, to develop and implement research-based program improvement strategies, and to use program accountability systems for evaluation purposes. Students study a wide range of research tools, read and discuss a wide range of evaluation papers and reports, and complete an applied evaluation project. Pre-req:WWS507b/c or instr. permission.

SPI 515C - Program and Policy Evaluation: Impact Evaluation Tools

Introduces evaluation using advanced quantitative techniques. Explores ways to develop and implement research-based program improvement strategies and accountability systems; judges effects of policies and programs; assesses benefits and costs of changes. Uses domestic and international examples. Introduces a range of evaluation tools and designs by applying tools empirically with Stata, using data from several large-scale impact evaluations. Pre-reqs: 507c & 508c or instructor's permission.

SPI 519A - Negotiation, Persuasion and Social Influence: Theory and Practice (also PSY 528A)

Examines the principles of negotiation in organizational settings and provides firsthand experience in simulated negotiations. Theoretical and empirical research on the variables that affect success in negotiations is discussed. Students engage in a series of bargaining exercises between individuals and teams, and results are analyzed in detail by the class. Course is taught in two versions, 519a for MPA's, 519b for MPP's.

SPI 521 - Domestic Politics

An introduction to the political analysis of policy making in the American setting. The course includes theoretical and empirical analyses of political institutions, including executives, legislatures, and bureaucracies. It also examines the political environment in which these institutions operate, with special attention given to the role of public opinion, interest groups, and elections.

SPI 522 - Microeconomic Analysis of Domestic Policy

A series of major issues of policy designed to illustrate and develop skills in particularly important applications of microeconomics. Topics include education and training, the minimum wage, mandated benefits, affirmative action, the theory of public goods and externalities, and the basic theory of taxation. Prerequisite: 511b.

SPI 523 - Legal and Regulatory Policy Toward Markets

Employs the methods of microeconomics, industrial organization and law, and economics to study circumstances where market failures warrant government intervention with policies implemented through the law or regulatory agencies. Topics include antitrust policy toward business practices and vertical and horizontal combinations; policy approaches toward R&amp;D and intellectual property; reliance on tort law, disclosure law, and regulatory standards to mitigate information and externality problems pertaining to health, safety, and performance risks; and the implications for pricing, entry, and investment of different forms of public utility reg

SPI 524 - The Political Economy of Central Banking

An extension of 512c, the course covers economic growth, the roles of R&D, education, and institutions in long-run development, fiscal and monetary policy in the long run, unemployment, short-run fiscal and monetary policy, economic fluctuations, the budget, and the statu of the US economy. Course aims to show how modern theoretical and quantitative methods can be useful in analyzing macroeconomic policy issues. Focus is on a series of specific topics of current policy interest. Prerequisite: 512c.

SPI 525 - Public Economics and Public Policy

Analyses government involvement when there are "market failures." Topics include: externalities, with applications to policies that alleviate congestion and reduce environmental damage; natural monopolies, with applications to telecommunications infrastructure and electricity regulation and pricing; efficiency and equity aspects of excise and income taxes; and alternative social security structures and reform proposals in the U.S. and other countries.

SPI 527A - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 527B - Topics in Domestic Policy (also GSS 527)

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 527C - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 527D - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy are discussed.

SPI 528A - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 528B - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 528C - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 528D - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy. Fall term courses are numbered 527; spring term courses are numbered 528.

SPI 528F - Topics in Domestic Policy

Various issues concerning domestic public policy.

SPI 529 - Great Leadership in Historical Perspective

Course uses the lens of history to evaluate why some individuals are considered most effective as elected, bureaucratic, and appointed officials in American history. Course evaluates social scientific models of leadership, then delves into the historical record to discover any patterns. Careful consideration is given to the distinct challenges posed by different institutional settings. A wide range of influential leaders, including Gifford Pinchot at the Dept of Agriculture, Lyndon Johnson in the Senate, Wilbur Cohen at the Social Security Administration and George Schultz at State, will be examined.

SPI 530 - Values Based Leadership

Patterns of political behavior impinging on American national policy, with special attention given to the changing role of the presidency. The course examines the post-Franklin Roosevelt "presidential institution" and evaluates the organization and decision-making procedures of each presidency.

SPI 531 - Identity, Power, and Policy

This course provides an overview of how identity and power inform public policy in the U.S. and across the globe. Among the topics examined are: immigration and identity dynamics across the globe; identity, psychology, and public policy; questions of race, ethnicity, and group identity in residential segregation; the intersections of identity concerns with drug policies, policing, and sentencing; identity and economic development in Africa and the U.S.; policymaking and Islamic identity; and the ever-evolving identity politics in the U.S. as they inform media, elections, and policymaking.

SPI 533 - Planning Theory and Process (also ARC 535)

Introduces planning theory, history, and practice. Examines urban, suburban, and regional planning processes, emphasizing the United States and Europe. Analyzes alternative planning models, issues such as ethics and social justice, and the diverse roles of public and private sector planners.

SPI 534 - Land Use Policy and Planning

Urban and metropolitan agglomerations, including land-use structure and the integration of employment, housing, transportation, and service activity are examined. Emphasis is on public policy and planning remedies for structural problems of cities and suburbs.

SPI 535 - Planning Methods

Introduces a set of quantitative tools that are widely used in urban and regional planning practice. The focus is on the development of an operational understanding of techniques for applied decision analysis and modeling of demographic change, regional economic systems, land use and facility location, and infrastructure systems.

SPI 537 - Urban Inequality and Social Policy (also SOC 537)

A review of the historical emergence and social evolution of cities and urban life. Course presents current theories regarding the ecological and social structure of urban areas, and how urban social organization affects the behavior and well-being of human beings who live and work in cities.

SPI 538 - Urban Economics

This is a course in urban and regional economics. We study the main economic forces that lead to the emergence of cities and regional agglomeration, and the effects on worker productivity, urban amenities, and congestion. We discuss the problems in measuring these urban characteristics, the methodologies to do it, as well as the design of optimal urban policy. We also study the economic theory and evidence on the internal structure of cities, as well as the policies that can enhance urban living. Finally, the course analyzes the role cities play in aggregate economic development. Prerequisite: WWS 511c and 512b/c.

SPI 539 - Urban Politics and Policymaking

This course provides an overview of the major questions and debates surrounding politics and public policy in US cities. The course begins by examining the historical evolution and key institutions of cities. This background provides the context for studying how cities are governed and who (or what) determines municipal public policy. The course explores the salience of race, ethnicity, and inequality in American cities and touches on political participation, as well as the growth of metropolitan areas. Course readings and discussion cover a range of municipal public policy domains, including fiscal policy, policing, and growth policies.

SPI 540 - Urbanization and Development

Examines the origins, types, and characteristics of cities in less developed countries and the ways in which patterns of urbanization interact with policies to promote economic growth and social equity. Readings and class discussions address three areas: a) a history of urbanization in the Third World; b) an analysis of contemporary urban systems, demographic patterns, and the social structure of large Third World cities; c) a review of the literature on urban dwellers with emphasis on the poor and their political and social outlooks.

SPI 541 - International Politics

An introduction to international relations, primarily through the examination of selected episodes. The emphasis is on decision-making processes, the politics of foreign policy making, and the interaction of these national phenomena with the international system.

SPI 542 - International Economics

Survey course in international economics for non-specialists. The first half covers microeconomic topics such as trade theory and policy, multilateral trade negotiations and regional economic integration. The second half addresses macroeconomic topics such as current account imbalances, exchange rates, and international financial crises. The course stresses concepts and real-world applications rather than formal models. Prerequisite: 511b, 512b concurrently.

SPI 543 - International Trade Policy

Evaluates arguments for and against protection and adjustment assistance and considers topics chosen from the following: non-tariff barriers, dumping, embargo threats and trade warfare, and the political economy of trade policy formation. Special attention is given to trade problems of the less-developed countries, including North-South trade relations and commodity price stabilization. Prerequisite: 511c.

SPI 544 - International Macroeconomics

Issues in open economy macroeconomics and international finance. Topics include an exchange rate determination and dynamics, macroeconomic policy under fixed and floating exchange rates, current account behavior, exchange rate management and international policy coordination, and the history of the international monetary system. Special attention is given to the analysis of exchange rate crises. Prerequisite: 512c.

SPI 547 - The Conduct of International Diplomacy

Offers a comparative look at the making and implementation of policy in the international arena. It explores key concepts and theories concerning national interest, negotiation, strategies of action and influence, crisis management and conflict resolution, and it applies those concepts via case studies and simulations in diplomacy, counter-terrorism, foreign assistance, and security policy.

SPI 548 - Weapons of Mass Destruction and International Security

This course examines the roles of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons in international security historically, at present, and in possible futures. The technical basis for these weapons will be presented at a level suitable for the non-scientist, and the challenges of state and non-state acquisition or development will be assessed. Topics to be examined include deterrence, defense, preemption, arms control, nonproliferation, and plausible terrorist capabilities.

SPI 549 - National Security Policy

Examines the changing meaning of "national security" and the various policies and institutions through which states may seek to enhance it. Course emphasizes the formation and implementation of national security policy by the United States government.

SPI 550 - PhD Gateway in Security Studies

The field fo Security Studies is distinguished by its focus on a clearly delineated set of intellectual and practical problems. This course will serve as the required gateway for all students entering the Woodrow Wilson School's new PhD cluster in Security Studies. Students will take this course during the fall semester of their first year.

SPI 552 - The Politics of Globalization

The multiple set of relationships between rich and poor countries, including borrowing and the promotion of political and economic models of governance, trade, investment, loans and aid; migration; environmental degradation and protection; and cultural diffusion. The course concludes with an assessment of the likelihood of accommodation and confrontation in the post-Cold War world.

SPI 555A - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 555B - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 555C - Topics in IR

Investigates democratization as a global phenomenon. Introduces the dominant theoretical debates over the meaning of democracy. Considers: goals and objectives of democracy; democracies in history; importance of requisites (economic, cultural, political) for democracy; domestic versus transnational constraints on democratization; links between democratization and marketization. The emphasis is on empirical comparisons.

SPI 555D - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 555E - Topics in IR

This course deals with significant issues in the study of international relations. Topics vary based on the expertise of regular faculty and visiting lecturers. In principle, fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556. The only exception to this rule is when a Topics in IR course originates in the fall, but needs to be shifted to the spring in a subsequent year.

SPI 556A - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 556B - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 556C - Topics in IR (also POL 580)

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 556D - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 556E - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 556F - Topics in IR (also NES 559)

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 556G - Topics in IR

Courses that examine particular issues in international relations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and the instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 555; spring term courses are numbered 556.

SPI 558 - Human Rights

This course looks at human rights as a public policy issue. It considers debates over the definition of human rights; the possibilities and limits of humanitarian intervention; the ability of human rights activists and international actors to undermine dictatorial governments; and the impact of the laws of war. We consider historical and contemporary cases around the world, including the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, Bosnia, China, and more.

SPI 559 - The Rule of Law

Considers role of law in gov't: When is a state constrained by law & when it may legitimately change/ignore the law? Use a range of materials from fiction to court cases, legal theory to political history, etc. Proceed by negative example, considering cases from the US: Lincoln's conduct during Civil War, Roosevelt's economic emergency, the Cold War, Nixonian exceptionalism, "war on terror" after 9/11. Also consider comparative examples: Russian Revolution, the collapse of the Weimar constitution, the breaks from communism in the "revolutions" of 1989 & beyond. Also Nuremberg Trials & Kosovar War.

SPI 561 - The Comparative Political Economy of Development (also POL 523)

Political change and the operation of political institutions in the development process. The course emphasizes the interaction of political and economic factors. Various definitions and theories of political development are examined and tested against different economic, ethnic, geographic, and social contexts.

SPI 562B - Economic Analysis of Development

An introduction to the processes of economic growth and development. The course covers a variety of topics, including the analysis of various theories of development, public expenditure and taxation, poverty and inequality measurement, and analyses of policies pertaining to trade, commodity pricing, foreign indebtedness, shadow pricing, and project evaluation. Prerequisite for 562b: 511b. Prerequisite for 562c: 511c.

SPI 562C - Economic Analysis of Development (Advanced)

An introduction to the processes of economic growth and development. The course covers a variety of topics, including the analysis of various theories of development, public expenditure and taxation, poverty and inequality measurement, and analyses of policies pertaining to trade, commodity pricing, foreign indebtedness, shadow pricing, and project evaluation. Prerequisite for 562b: 511b. Prerequisite for 562c: 511c.

SPI 564 - Poverty, Inequality and Health in the World (also POP 564)

About well-being throughout the world, with focus on income and health. Explores what happened to poverty, inequality, and health, in the US, and internationally. Discusses conceptual foundations of national and global measures of inequality, poverty, and health; construction of measures, and extent to which they can be trusted; relationship between globalization, poverty, and health, historically and currently. Examines links between health and income, why poor people are less healthy and live less long than rich people. Prereqs: 507 and 511. Please see instructor to apply for enrollment.

SPI 565 - Social Determinants of Health (also SOC 565)

Course examines how and why society can make us sick or healthy and how gender, race/ethnicity, wealth, education, occupation and other social statuses shape health outcomes. It looks at the role of social institutions, and environment-society interactions in shaping health outcomes and examines how these factors underlie some of the major causes of illness and death around the world including infant mortality, infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, and chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. The course draws on historical and cross-cultural material from the U.S. as well as global examples from different countries around the world.

SPI 566A - Topics in Health (also POP 566)

This series covers a range of important topics in global health policy, focusing on policy responses to current challenges. These provide a more in-depth study of particular issues, such as health financing, mental health, or the role of technology in healthcare.

SPI 568 - Economics of Health in Developing Countries

Health care policy formulation focusing on developing countries. Theory and practical lessons on how policy is, or isn't, translated into programs. Students will analyze global epidemiological threats to the infrastructure and financial stability of health care systems. Examines: 1) how alternative health care finance and reform strategies facilitate or create barriers to achieving policy objectives; and 2) explores the role of governments, WHO, NGOs, and donor agencies in setting the agenda for health policy.

SPI 571 - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 571A - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 571B - Topics in Development

Introduces development policy challenges in Africa. Reviews debate about development policy in the Independence era, reasons for success or failure of structural adjustment policies, challenges of institutional reform, and the relationship between accountability and democratization. Examines war-peace transitions, and health policy and the response to HIV/AIDS.Assumes some background in the study of Africa. Supplementary readings available for social science Ph.D. students.

SPI 571C - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 571D - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 572 - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 572A - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 572B - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 572C - Topics in Development

These courses treat particular issues of economic and social policy of developing nations. Topics vary according to the interests of the students and instructors. Fall term courses are numbered 571; spring term courses are numbered 572.

SPI 574 - Making Government Work in Hard Places

The course focuses on the "micro" level, not on broad principles of aid effectiveness or unified theories of political development. It asks you to place yourselves in the shoes of the reformer (Seretse Khama, Lee Kuan Yew). You have a limited opportunity to build a new institutional order and improve the provision of public goods. Under what conditions is it worth making this investment? What options are available to you? How can you get around the challenges that inevitably arise? Is there a way to lock in these changes and help new institutions endure, transforming pockets of effectiveness into broader institutional change?

SPI 576A - Topics in Regional and Country Studies

Structural and behavioral characteristics of representative developing economic and political systems. Normally at least one course is offered each year. These courses do not duplicate basic coverage of the history or politics of a country or region provided in the University's undergraduate curriculum. Fall term courses are numbered 575; spring term courses are numbered 576.

SPI 576B - Topics in Regional and Country Studies

Structural and behavioral characteristics of representative developing economic and political systems. Normally at least one course is offered each year. These courses do not duplicate basic coverage of the history or politics of a country or region provided in the University's undergraduate curriculum. Fall term courses are numbered 575; spring term courses are numbered 576.

SPI 581C - Topics in Economics

This course covers a range of topics, including portfolio theory, asset pricing, financial instruments, and the roles played by banks and other institutions in modern financial markets. Prerequisite: 511c.

SPI 582A - Topics in Economics

This course covers a range of topics, including portfolio theory, asset pricing, financial instruments, and the roles played by banks and other institutions in modern financial markets. Prerequisite: 511c.

SPI 582B - Topics in Economics

Introduces the use of economics in thinking about and dealing with environmental issues. Stresses the economics externalities and the design of policy as an instance of organizing gains from trade. Applications to a variety of problems, among them air pollution (including, importantly, global climate change), water pollution, solid waste and hazardous substances management, species preservation and population policy, are examined.

SPI 582C - Topics in Economics

This course analyzes the causes and consequences of income and wealth inequality in developing and industrial countries. Issues considered include: the inequality-growth relationship, the contributions of technological change and trade to rising wage inequality; socioeconomic segragation in cities; and the costs and benefits of different redistributive policies. Particular attention is paid to the roles of credit markets, human capital externalities, rent-seeking behavior, and sociopolitical instability. Policies studied include land reform, education, finance, fiscal policy and reform of the welfare state.

SPI 582F - Topics in Economics

This course covers a range of topics, including portfolio theory, asset pricing, financial instruments, and the roles played by banks and other ihnstitutions in modern financial markets.

SPI 585B - Topics in STEP

These are courses intended to help students develop and apply skills in the application of scientific, technological, and environmental analyses to problems of policy interest. Fall courses are numbered 585, Spring courses are numbered 586.

SPI 585C - Topics in STEP

These are courses intended to help students develop and apply skills in the application of scientific, technological, and environmental analyses to problems of policy interest. Fall courses are numbered 585, Spring courses are numbered 586.

SPI 586A - Topics in STEP

These are courses intended to help students develop and apply skills in the application of scientific, technological, and environmental analyses to problems of policy interest. Fall courses are numbered 585, Spring courses are numbered 586.

SPI 586B - Topics in STEP (also EEB 516)

These are courses intended to help students develop and apply skills in the application of scientific, technological, and environmental analyses to problems of policy interest. Fall courses are numbered 585, Spring courses are numbered 586.

SPI 586D - Topics in STEP

These are courses intended to help students develop and apply skills in the application of scientific, technological, and environmental analyses to problems of policy interest. Fall courses are numbered 585, Spring courses are numbered 586.

SPI 586E - Topics in STEP

These are courses intended to help students develop and apply skills in the application of scientific, technological, and environmental analyses to problems of policy interest. Fall courses are numbered 585, Spring courses are numbered 586.

SPI 586F - Topics in STEP (also COS 586)

Currently unavailable

SPI 589 - Methods in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy

Presents a set of quantitative analysis tools for study and practice of science, technology, and public policy. Topics include: selected aspects of order-of-magnitude estimation and natural scales, archetypal scientific logics and laws, experimental policy design, risk assessment, tradeoff analysis, innovation/diffusion/growth models, technology assessment, and bottom-up modeling. The goal is to develop an operational understanding of these techniques through lectures in-class exercises, and several short written quantitative explorations. Prerequisite: 507 or permission of the instructor.

SPI 590A - Economic Perspectives on Inequality (Half Term)

Economics is centrally concerned with models of human capital development, educational attainment, labor market dynamics, unemployment, labor turnover, job duration, wage setting institutions, the role of unions, human capital formation, the relationship between economic status and other aspects of well-being (including health). Economists are essential partners in the behavioral study of preferences and decision making, mobility and redistribution, and the institutions of industrial relations that govern the labor market.

SPI 590B - Politics of Inequality and Redistribution (Half-Term) (also POL 598)

Policy preferences, differential rates of political participation, voting behavior, the legislative process, political communication, urban politics and the role of race in American political life are central to the study of inequality in politics. Although the American case features prominently, we approach these issues from a comparative perspective. The course provides introduction to comparative study of welfare states and political economy of advanced industrial countries, including regulation of labor markets and relationship between wage inequality, income distribution and policy preferences for redistribution and social protection.

SPI 590C - Sociological Studies of Inequality(Half -Term) (also SOC 571)

Sociologists often see social inequality as produced by one of three types of social processes: market exchanges, the non-market organization of social groups, and political institutions. Intellectual objectives of this unit are to (1) develop an understanding of the main features of a sociological analysis of inequality, and (2) introduce students to key empirical research agendas in the field of stratification and inequality.

SPI 590D - Psychological Studies of Inequality (Half-Term) (also PSY 590)

Two major areas of psychology make important contributions to the study of social policy and inequality . The first is social psychology, which focuses on inter-group relations, interpersonal perception, stereotyping, racism, aggression, justice and fairness. These are the micro-level building blocks of structural inequalities and processes that are shaped by the larger context of race, ethnic and gender relations. The second is the fields of social-cognition, judgment and decision making , areas of research that study human information processing in a way that is not about individual differences, and often not social.

SPI 590S - Workshop in Social Policy

A course required for and limited to students in the Joint Degree program in Social Policy. Papers drafted in the year-long course WWS 590a,b,c,d must be revised and submitted to the workshop leader by August 20. Papers will be provided to an expert reader outside of the Princeton faculty, who is invited to join the seminar for sessions devoted to each student paper. Each student will present his/her own paper and simultaneously contribute written critiques of one another's papers. By the end of the term, students will be required to submit their papers for publication to a leading journal.

SPI 591 - Policy Workshops

Policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve M.P.A. and M.P.P. students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591A - Policy Workshop

These policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591B - Policy Workshop

Policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591C - Policy Workshop

Policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591D - Policy Workshop

Policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve M.P.A. and M.P.P. students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workship produces a collective report or recommendation.The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591E - Policy Workshop

These policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591F - Policy Workshop

These policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591G - Policy Workshop

These policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 591H - Policy Workshop

These policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve MPA and MPP students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 592 - Policy Workshops

Policy workshops normally involve a group of six to twelve M.P.A. and M.P.P. students working on a specific policy problem under faculty supervision. Students frequently work with original source materials and data. Often the workshop produces a collective report or recommendation. The objective is for students to bring to bear the full range of skills emphasized in the curriculum.

SPI 593 - Policy Analysis: Selected Topics (Half-Term)

Half-term courses which analyse a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593A - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593B - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593C - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593D - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593E - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term) (also SOC 585)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593F - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593G - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593H - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593I - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593J - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593K - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These couses focus on theanalysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix andmatch" half-term courses, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Fall Term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses 594.

SPI 593L - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half-term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593M - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

Examines the policy and practice of developing income-restricted affordable housing in the United States (new and rehabilitated, single-family and multi-family, for sale and rental) by the public, private, and nonprofit sectors

SPI 593N - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can "mix and match" half-term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 593O - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

An overview of the epidemiologic transition, reviewing historic and current health patterns, and examines the demographic forces that have led to rapid aging of populations worldwide. After consideration of how researchers measure health status in older populations, the course examines inequalities in health by gender, race and socioeconomic status. The final part of the course considers the potential impact of threats to future improvements in life expectancy and focuses on the social, health and economic consequences of societal aging, primarily in high-income countries.

SPI 593P - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

A half-term course designed for MPP's to cover basic concepts and findings from psychology and their application in policy development. Topics include bounded rationality, group dynamics, memory, judgment and decision making biases, behavioral economics, public opinion, social determinants of behavior, attitudes, psychological assessment, and a psychological perspective on incentive structures, all of which have implications for the design of policies that affect individual citizens as well as for the functioning of organizations that determine policy.

SPI 593Q - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

This course presents tools for designing, implementing, and analyzing impact evaluations from a practitioner's perspective. It explores real-world problems and practical limitations frequently encountered in conducting evaluations and methodological tools to address them. Topics include program operation rules and their implications for design choice, process and standards for assessing evidence, challenges to randomization, sample size determination, complex sample design, and construction of analytic and non response weights. Students practice addressing these issues through a series of case studies and analytic exercises.

SPI 593R - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term) (also POP 593R)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are equivalent to one full-term course.

SPI 593S - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course.

SPI 593T - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

An introduction to the policies and practices associated with conducting elections in fragile states and develop an understanding of their impacts on electoral outcomes. In fragile political and security environments, electoral policy and practice take on an enhanced importance because of the consequences of state failure which could result from a flawed election. Focuses on: Role of International Community; Election Management Bodies; Electoral & Party Systems; Marginalized Electorates, Victims and Spoilers; Electoral Conflict, Security, & Justice; Electoral Observation & Evaluation.

SPI 593Z - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course.

SPI 594 - Policy Analysis: Selected Topics (Half-Term)

Half-term courses which analyse a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594A - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594B - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594C - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term) (also POP 594C)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594D - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594E - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594F - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594G - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594H - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594I - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594J - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594K - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594L - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses would be the equivalent of one full term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594M - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half term courses, either within or across semesters, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Fall Term courses are numbered 593; Spring Term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594N - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

Examines various topics within policy analysis. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594O - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

An applied politics course whose goal is to teach students how to conduct winning campaigns for public office. Real campaigns will be studied, with an emphasis on the fundamentals: raising money and the ethics of fundraising, framing campaign messages, organizing precincts, getting out the vote, and the ethics of negative advertizing. Course will be taught by an experienced practitioner who won eight Congressional campaigns.

SPI 594P - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

This course will focus on three aspects of decision making under uncertainty: 1. techniques to quantify uncertainty using Bayesian methods for discrete and continuous prior distributions; 2. techniques to combine uncertainties from multiple sources using Monte Carlo simulation; and 3. methods for estimating the value of new information. These subjects will be discussed primarily in the context of their use, nonuse and misuse by federal and international institutions that use cost-benefit analysis to regulate risks to health, safety, the environment and welfare. Examples will include both prospective analyses and retrospective program evalu

SPI 594Q - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594R - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numnbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594. Courses with alternating letters beginning with "a" will be offered in the first half of the term, courses with alternating letters beginning with "b" will be offered in the second half of the term.

SPI 594S - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

Examine issues of terrorism, security, and regime stability in hydrocarbon producing and exporting states in the Middle East and Central Asia. Attention will be given to episodes of terrorism directed against energy infrastructure, terrorist motivations, and other sources of political instability. Potential threats and implications will be explored, as will their implications on global energy supplies. These topics will be studied in the relation to developments in both the Middle East (Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states, Iran, Iraq, Libya) and Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan).

SPI 594T - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term) (also POP 594T)

Course examines their political systems in a comparative framework, comparing them both among themselves and with other developing countries, drawing on various approaches of political sociology and, in particular, political economy. Course will start with a review of ¿State formation and state-society relations in the Gulf: what is Gulf politics?¿ and conclude with a session on "Implications for US foreign policy."

SPI 594U - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594

SPI 594V - Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term)

These courses focus on the analysis of a variety of policy issues. Students can mix and match half-term courses, either within or across terms, choosing a combination of two that best suits their interests. Two half-term courses are the equivalent of one full-term course. Fall term courses are numbered 593; Spring term courses are numbered 594.

SPI 595B - PhD Seminar: Research Design (also POL 509)

This is a course in research design. We will discuss some issues in the philosophy of science, then analyze questions of conceptualization, proceeding to problems of descriptive inference, objectivity, and causal inference, including the role of causal mechanisms. The seminar will continue with analysis of how to avoid bias, then tackle issues of historical change. Students will present their own research designs and critique those of their colleagues. Emphasis will be on qualitative research, but the argument underlying the seminar is that the same basic principles of inference apply to qualitative and quantitative research, and that the

SPI 597 - Public Policy Approaches to Health and Health Care

Course explores the professed and unspoken goals nations pursue with their health systems and the alternative economic and administrative structures different nations use to pursue those goals. Course will emphasize the industrialized world, although some time may be spent later in the course to consider approaches used in developing countries, if students want to.

SPI 598 - Epidemiology (also POP 508)

Measurement of health status, illness occurrence, mortality and impact of associated risk factors; techniques for design, analysis and interpretation of epidemiologic research studies; sources of bias and confounding; and causal inference. Other topics include foundations of modern epidemiology, the epidemiologic transition, reemergence of infectious disease, social inequalities in health, and ethical issues. Course examines bridging of "individual-centered" epidemiology and "macro-epidemiology" to recognize social, economic and cultural context, assess impacts on populations, and provide inputs for public health and health policy.

SPI 599 - Extramural Public Policy Fellowship

This course is limited to students participating in the Scholars in the Nation's Service Initiative (SINSI), the Richard H. Ullman Fellowship, or an approved MPA middle year out. Enrolled students participate in one or more internships with a federal, state, or local government agency, non-governmental organization, or multilateral institution in the U.S. or overseas. The purpose is to provide a learning environment for students to use/develop quantitative and qualitative analytical skills in an active public policy setting, with oversight from Princeton University faculty and staff.