Race Pressure and Self-Care: Why Evidence Based Meditation Matters

May 7 2015 -
8:00am to 9:15am
Hosted by Dr. David Campbell
Counseling and Psychological Services
 
Thursday, May 7
12:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Chancellor Green, Room 103
 
Lunch will be served.
 
This will be a conversational and experiential interaction to explore the emotional impact of race pressure and the importance and benefits of self-care, especially meditation (which is empirically validated as a tool to enhance resilience under stress and reduce anxiety). Dr. Campbell will guide a 10-15 minute meditation experience.
 
Licensed in New Jersey with more than 20 years of mental health experience, Dr. Campbell earned his doctorate in clinical psychology from the Graduate School and University Center at City College in 1996. He completed a clinical psychology internship at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and has been employed in both hospital and academic settings. As an assistant professor and counselor at the College of Staten Island, he researched and published in the area of intersubjectivity theory, racial identity and achievement behavior.  Dr. Campbell is interested in helping people to understand, manage and overcome psychological concerns. He has special interests in working with motivational conflicts that impede academic performance as well as assisting individuals to negotiate complexities of personal identity. His treatment approach serves to affirm his clients through recognizing and acknowledging the impact of socio-cultural forces while making sense of their personal experiences, and encouraging self-care activities, especially meditation.  Dr. Campbell has been at Princeton University since October 2004 and serves as the Coordinator of Group Counseling & Support and Coordinator of the Mind Body Health Services Team for Counseling and Psychological Services. He is a Certified Group Psychotherapist.
 
RSVP to this event to Jennifer Loessy at jloessy@princeton.edu or 609-258-9637.
Location: 
Contact: 
Jennifer Loessy
Sponsored by: 
Graduate School's Diversity and Inclusion team